Halloween during COVID-19: it’s a go!

Earlier this week, Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, said there’s no need to cancel Halloween as long we take precautions when it comes to masks, hand hygiene and physical distance. And as with all other things during the pandemic, participating in any activity is a big no-no for anyone who is symptomatic or feeling ill.  

But for those of us who feel healthy and eager to keep the spirit alive, read on for our suggestions to stay safe and healthy this Halloween. 

Trick-or-Treaters

  • Choose costumes that allow a non-medical mask to be worn underneath – make sure you can see and breathe comfortably.
  • Minimize contact with others: trick-or-treat with your family or cohort, remain within your community and stay two metres apart.
  • Avoid touching doorbells or railings: call “trick or treat” from two metres away, knock instead of using doorbells, use hand sanitizer after touching surfaces.
  • Wash hands and disinfect packages before eating candy.

Handing out treats

  • Wear a non-medical mask that fully covers your nose and mouth
  • Ask trick-or-treaters to knock or call out instead of ringing the doorbell
  • Use tongs to hand out pre-packaged candy to avoid handling treats
  • Find creative ways to maintain distance from trick-or-treaters:
    • Hand out treats from your driveway or front lawn, if weather permits
    • Set up a table or desk to help keep yourself distanced
    • Make candy bags and space them out on a table or blanket; don’t leave out self-serve bowls of bulk candy
    • Build a candy slide, candy catapult or other fun, non-touch delivery methods

The Teal Pumpkin Project has gained a lot of traction and been instrumental in raising awareness of food allergies and promoting a safer, more inclusive Halloween for all trick-or-treaters. As part of INLIV’s commitment to inclusivity, we recommend taking a trip to your neighbourhood dollar store where you’ll find tons of things such as colouring books and temporary tattoos to drop in the buckets of little ghouls and goblins. Putting a teal pumpkin on your doorstep lets your visitors know that you have non-food treats available!

Candy eaters

For those of us who struggle with overdoing it on the sugary sweets around this time of year, there are definitely ways to relieve some of the temptation.

Don’t skip dinner. Our registered dietitians recommend starting the evening with a healthy meal before you head out. You’ll be less tempted to sneak treats along the way. Plus, you’ll be a good example for trick-or-treaters who need to wait until you’ve santized their stash.

Ditch the pillow case. Choose a smaller container, and encourage kids to only take one piece of candy from each house. They’ll be able to visit more houses in the neighbourhood (with less collateral damage for you!).

Get moving! Walk instead of driving. Set a goal of how many houses or streets you’ll visit, or compete in teams to do as many as you can. Bring a bottle of water and a flashlight, and wear comfortable shoes for walking.

 

Have a happy, healthy and safe Halloween!